Nile Blue: Glass Uses

Glass in ancient Egypt was a luxury item and therefore was used for ornanmental or decorative purposes.  

Glass Ear Stud OR Amulet (uaz) with Longitudinal Bore from Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallerythe

Glass Ear Stud

This glass ear stud dates from New Kingdom period when glass was first produced in Egypt.  

Glass Beads from  Ägyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin - Preußischer Kulturbesitz

Glass Beads

These glass beads may have been part of a necklace or other jewelry.  They were found at Amarna, a city under the rule of Akhenaten, and a time-period known for its fine glass-works.  

Glass Spindle Bottle with Handle from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Glass Spindle Bottle with Handle

This glass bottle may have held resin.  It was designed to look like imported Syrian spindle pottery.   

Ancient Egyptian Pectoral from Ägyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin - Preußischer Kulturbesitz

Shrine-Shaped Pectoral 

This pectoral is shaped like a shrine and features a large blue faience scarab beetle and red glass.  Pectorals were worn on the chest as part of a necklace and usually featured amulets or images of deities.  Amulets were meant to protect the wearer by calling on a deity for protection.  Mummies are found wearing amulets and pectorals, like this one.  This piece dates to the 20th Dynasty, New Kingdom.   

Egyptian Inlays and Shrine Elements from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Glass and Copper Inlays 

This collection of highly detailed inlays are made from glass and copper alloys.  These very minute figures were likely a part of a decorated wooden shrine.  Decorative glass elements on shrines date back to the 6th century BC and later, glass hieroglyphs were used on wooden coffins from the 4th century BC, onward.  These pieces date from a later period, called Ptolemaic Period, which features Greek influences.

Nile Blue: Glass Uses